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GRAMMAR NOTES: CONJUNCTIONS

 
LSEG: conjunctions





Attention: the manner in which conjunctions are presented “grammatically” today, (in 2014), all over the Internet, is . . . bizarre, if not straightforward vulgar. Many “linguist scientists” advise their students/readers to use the acronym “FANBOYS” in order to remember working with conjunctions! However, that incredibly disgusting stupidity is just some sick poetical fantasy; it has nothing to do with Grammar.
LSEG: types of conjunctions


“Conjunctions” [CJ] have a complex binding functionality: conjunctions tie together two similar morphologic/syntactic elements, or they link two clauses in a complex sentence. Conjunction is the only morphologic element that manages to preserve its functionality throughout all three (different) grammatical domains: Morphology, Sentence Syntax, and Complex Sentence Syntax. Conjunctions are again very simple in form, except their functionality is among the most complex in English grammar [same as in any other language].
LSEG4: SUBCATEGORIES OF CONJUNCTIONS








Relational associations set by conjunctions correspond (roughly) to relational associations developed between the clauses of a complex sentence. Although the diagram on left could seem rather complicated, please note that conjunctional functionality is thoroughly explained in Complex Sentence Syntax, part four in LSEG4.
LSEG4: SUBCATEGORIES OF CONJUNCTIONS






Due to their inherent complex functionality, it is very difficult to structure conjunctions appropriately (based on their linking relations). Note that conjunctional functionality works, to its fullest, only in Complex Sentence Syntax: there is the place (in Grammar) where conjunctional functionality starts making some logical sense.

L4EW: FRAGMENT OF AN EXERCISE FROM CHAPTER CONJUNCTIONS









L4EW: fragment of an exercise from chapter "Conjunctions".

LSEG4 AND L4EW






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